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Helping Wildlife Thrive

Helping Wildlife Thrive

As more of the countryside disappears under new roads and house building schemes or is used for intensive crop production, gardens have become ever more important as a safe sanctuary for wildlife.

One garden might seem insignificant in preventing the decline of bees, a certain species of butterfly or helping birds to survive, but add it to the thousands of other gardens patch-worked across Britain, and it adds up to a big acreage with a huge impact. 

There’s a lot of rubbish talked about wildlife-friendly gardens, and many people worry that it means having a boring, untidy garden. Nothing could be further from the truth; many of our native plants are very beautiful, like the Guelder Rose or the Sea Buckthorn, which are worth a place in any garden. Making a wildlife garden doesn’t mean that you can’t grow non-native plants either; many, like Buddleia are a real boon for wildlife and look very beautiful too.

It’s all about making small changes. Choosing a native hedge like Beech, Yew, Hawthorn or Hornbeam for example – which in my opinion are the best hedges anyway – will make a big difference. Hawthorn makes a terrific country garden hedge, which even when kept clipped will provide pollen for insects, fruit for birds and small mammals and shelter and nesting sites too. If you’re choosing a tree, what could be more handsome - or attractive to wildlife - than Holly, Rowan, Silver Birch or a Crab Apple?  

You’ll find lots of tips about the best trees and shrubs for wildlife on the website - and remember that we’re always here to give advice and help with your queries to make a better garden.